We recently worked on an interesting project for EPSON shot by LA photographer Glen Wexler. The idea was to show how the world would look like in the near future with the help of technology from EPSON.

The project started out in NYC and continued for two weeks in Tokyo. The job was brought to life by an excellent team of video and still professionals consisting of creatives and assistants from the US as well as our local kick-ass team in Tokyo. Working with a local crew and on multiply locations in a foreign country is no news. Things went smooth, but with a daily doses of funny bone moments. Captureforce has years of experience working in foreign locations including Asia and east Asia, Russia, South Africa, Europe, and in most of the states within the US. Large projects like these can be resource draining and there’re always an element of surprise, but you’re also met with new people who will help make things happen and it’s rewarding to look at the finished outcome and know you’ve been a part of it.

On the tech side, we were shooting with the Hasselblad H cameras and a Phase One IQ 80Mpix digital back to create the unique files needed for the final composites. We were shooting after sunset when the energy of the city visualizes against the night sky. The final images were created by shooting around thirty 80Mpix files in a multi row cubic panorama formation, keeping the camera at its own nodal point, to create one large file. This process and the amazing retouching / CGI animation done by Glen Wexler’s own in-house post production department made the project incredibly special and we’re looking forward to share more EPSON moments with you in the future.

 

Best wishes,
Esben // Captureforce

Director: Glen Wexler
Client: EPSON America
Campaign name: Where there’s business there’s EPSON

 

[The theme of the campaign is to show a glimpse of how the world could look like in the near future with technology from EPSON computers, printers, projectors, robotics and industrial equipment. The 30 second commercial use imagery from the NYC downtown skyline and incorporate green screen footage together with CGI content and animation.]
There has always been a gap between DSLR and Medium format digital cameras, but that gap has now been narrowed, first by the Canon 5DS R and since the Nikon D850. We have been using both cameras side by side with high-end medium format digital cameras. The autofocus hit-rate is considerably better and the cameras are overall snappier. You get a lot of camera for your money, but keep in mind that shooting with the Canon 5Ds R or D850 requires that you step up your technique. In other words, the subject blur and camera shake that sometimes would be unnoticeable when using a lower Mpix camera will reveal itself immediately when using a 50+ Mpix camera. We now only recommend MFD to our clients when they need the outmost in image resolution and file integrity.
Another issue we recently noticed occurred during a shoot that included 2 rented cameras from a local rental house. Both cameras back-focused about 3” leaving the model’s eyes consistently out of focus. Technical issues always involve a bit of playing catch-up especially when you’re on set. They’re difficult to correct on the fly, and before you realize the problem and deem it serious enough to use time on, you could be an hour or so into your shoot. That’s why we always recommend renting cameras and lenses from us. We simply know our cameras and have already ironed out all the kinks.
We know better. We have been hand picking our lenses for years. That’s how we ensure our lenses are meeting your expectations. Our practice has been to buy as many as possible of each lens and then to compare their performance. At times, the results are surprisingly equal, but at times, some lenses are far apart in regards to image quality. Our suggestion is to test the lens you’re buying… it’s the only way to get the best performing lens for your camera.
The above picture shows 6 lenses compared agains each other at 100%.

 

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